Dear doctors, be kind to each other.

I met a young doctor who used to work with me recently. I had just completed my night rounds in the hospital and I was leaving for home.

And then I saw him. He was unkempt, exhausted and appeared famished. Worst of all, he looked like a man who has totally given up on being a doctor. He appeared hesitant when I asked him what was wrong, but I could not just leave him there.

After much persuasion and insistence on my part he agreed to join me for a late supper. While he ravaged through his first proper meal of the day, he finally opened up. He has started working for the past week in a new speciality. Though the hours are longer, it was not an issue. He was well aware of the sacrifices he was expected to make.

However, the degradation, humiliation and constant harassment have finally taken their toll. He was literally chased out of the ward just minutes before he met me because he could not remember the details of a patient he clerked. He was not allowed to refer to his notes and had to recite the lab results by heart like a trained poodle. The words were abusive, hurtful and condescending. And worst of all, it was said right in front of the patient.

He finished his meal and stood up to leave. And as he left he said this “Please don’t worry about me. I will be fine”. I was not convinced. The shame of being publicly humiliated is not a stain that washes easily.

The doctor-patient relationship often takes centre stage, but the epitome of good clinical practice depends on how the doctors treat each other. The medical profession is filled with fragile and vulnerable egos that often have trouble working with each other in a genuine collaboration of trust and mutual respect.

We complain, argue, fight and obsess for the sake of our patients, but do we dare reflect for even an iota of moment our actions and attitude towards our fellow caregivers?

So what went wrong in the noblest of professions and how do we fix it?

Stop the stereotyping of doctors 

“The surgeon knows nothing and does everything. The physician knows everything and does nothing. The psychiatrist knows nothing and does nothing. The pathologist knows everything, but always a week too late”.

“Surgeons are egomaniacs, anaesthesiologists are lazy, orthopaedic surgeons are meatheads, obstetricians are mean and brain surgeons think they are God”

There isn’t a single medical speciality that has not been ripped apart and ridiculed.

As I continue to mature and evolve in clinical practice I have encountered a variety of doctors. And most of them share a common trait.  They live under a grand delusion that their speciality is the only one that matters and worth doing. They have strong negative feelings about doctors who have chosen a different career path and have a deep seated urge to insult them at every opportunity they get.

This has to stop. Every facet of medicine is equally important.

As a clinical cardiologist I depend on the primary care physicians to detect and refer their patients to me early for cardiac interventions. It would be near impossible for me to screen all the patients with coronary artery disease in the population. I lean heavily on the cardiac surgeons for cases not amenable to minimally invasive interventions. The endocrinologists help us manage the difficult diabetics who need expert fine tuning of their insulin regimes. The emergency physicians are crucial front liners in diagnosing acute cases and stabilizing them prior to sending them to the cardiac care unit. The intensive care specialists help us manage the ventilated patients and are crucial to the running of our cardiology services.

Every single doctor provides an important aspect of patient care which complements the work of the other. We work like a grand complex machine where every part is imperative to the running of sound and safe clinical practice.  We are all equally important. And that is the often forgotten ‘stereotype’.

You don’t need to criticize or challenge other doctors to earn respect 

I read an article recently where a rival oncologist told the parents of a young patient with incurable cancer that he could have saved her life had she been brought to him earlier. He completely disregarded the considered opinion made by the oncologist who actually managed the patient from the beginning. His actions were borne without actually consulting the managing oncologist and in that one frivolous statement completely shattered  the foundation of trust the parents had on the treating team. This unnecessary disagreement between doctors often compromises the best interest of the patient.

Rival doctors often spread malicious lies about their colleagues. I have a friend who works in an established private centre and a rival cardiologist once told one of his patients that “he was a far more brilliant cardiologist” and that my friend was less experienced than he was.

Another surgeon told personal details about another doctor to his patients including mistakes he made as an intern and his unfortunate marital problems. 

Just recently I overheard a junior doctor thrashing his ward colleague in front of the nurse’s station. He knew I was within earshot and yet continued to speak ill of his colleague who happens to be a trustworthy, humble and talented doctor.

This leads to lack of trust between doctors and dents one’s reputation. A patient is unlikely to respect a doctor who openly criticizes another and may feel threatened you would do the same to them. 

Bullying is not a necessary evil for training doctors 

One of my mentors told me prior to my training as a physician that one of the most important attribute I was expected to develop was a thick skin to criticism and condescension.

Each doctor invariably undergoes a different form of bullying throughout a long career. It can be as subtle as denying one the privilege of referring to a patient’s chart while presenting a case just seen barely fifteen minutes ago amid a flurry of admission. Or it can be downright humiliating like being called ‘stupid’ and ‘incompetent’ during morning rounds for an incorrect answer.

I have seen senior surgeons screaming at their residents and interns during surgery for seemingly simple or negligible errors. Every small mistake during surgery is magnified out of proportion and a running commentary will follow suit on how the doctor ‘does not have what it takes to be a good surgeon’.

Physicians are often in a foul mood early in the morning if the lab results are not available on time although the interns would have personally delivered the blood samples to the lab technicians. The interns will face the brunt of their anger knowing full well they did nothing wrong.

Radiologist are often condescending when interns request for an emergency CT scan as they are an easier target compared to the senior consultant whose orders the interns are carrying out.

Family physicians and general practitioners are often the object of irate registrars and consultants who feel they contribute nothing to proper patient care not realizing the crucial role these primary care physicians play in screening patients prior to sending them to tertiary care.

A paediatrician may swear at a doctor for missing an intravenous cannulation on a preterm neonate and then adopt a serene demeanour when facing the parents of the child.

We often excuse doctors who are bullies because they are ‘great with patients’ and are ‘brilliant clinicians’ or ‘gifted surgeons’. This hurts the profession more than you can imagine.

Doctors trained in this hostile environment will foster deep resentment towards their peers. It becomes ingrained in their psyche. Once they get better and more confident they will develop the same impatience that was shown to them towards their junior doctors. And they will in turn become the very bullies they once despised.

This never ending vicious cycle will continue and the interns will mature into senior doctors thinking that bullying and condescension is a necessary tool for training doctors. 

Bullies are cowards. Period. There is no way we can justify the actions of those who continuously seek ways to make the lives of others miserable. Since bullies only respond to strength, the medical hierarchy should start becoming much stronger. Cultures that shun the bullies making them look weak instead of the recipient should be fostered. This is easier said than done as the bullies often sit at the top of the food chain but cultures change because people are committed and steadfast in changing them.

Good and honest communication saves lives 

Newly minted doctors need proper training to become competent and safe. They should be encouraged to ask questions and any uncertainty regarding a patient’s management will be cleared during the rounds. The young doctors learn by observing the intricate process of decision making that goes into managing a patient and in time they will become better clinicians.

Suppose a senior registrar or a consultant barks at every question as it is a ‘waste of his precious time’ or that ‘you are supposed to know this’. The junior doctors will hold back their questions or doubts for they are preoccupied with fear of appearing incompetent or lazy. They fall into the trap of placing emphasis on trying to save face and look like they know what they are doing at all times rather than admitting ignorance.

The interns will dread the clinical rounds and will only perform the most basic of duties such as tracing the lab results, writing the discharge summary and updating the progress notes. They will immerse themselves in paperwork and avoid spending time preparing for clinical rounds.

Since the interns and junior doctors are often the ones manning the wards after clinical rounds while the consultants and registrars are engaged in the busy clinics, subtle deterioration in a patient’s clinical condition can go unnoticed. The interns who lack proper clinical training to detect such dangers or even the ones who may suspect something wrong but hold back in apprehension out of creating a false alarm, may not alert the senior doctors until its too late.

The patient’s care is severely compromised and the interns will retreat further into their shell as they will be blamed for this unfortunate event. If the interns try to defend themselves and argue back, they will be blackballed throughout their career in medical practice and labelled for insubordination. 

And shame does not encourage improvement. The culture of blame and punishment fosters more mistakes and fatalities. Doctors do not report their errors for fear of retribution.

And our mistakes will work its way down to affect the patient’s lives.

The  doctor-patient relationship paradigm depends closely on the doctor-doctor relationship. Bad and damaging cultures foster a hostile atmosphere that erodes trust, tarnishes good communication and promotes disrespect within the medical community. The role doctors play in harming each other ubiquitously affects the patient’s care, however unintentionally. 

If we work in an environment where we are kind, tolerant and respectful of each other, we will in turn be more humane to our patients. Young doctors will be nurtured in a system that is steeped in kindness and compassion and they in turn will become sound clinicians who resonate the same values. 

It is, as Plato once said “Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a harder battle”. 

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152 responses to “Dear doctors, be kind to each other.

  1. Reblogged this on lulupig and commented:
    To all the doctors, and doctor-to-be out there. Do not only be good in skills, but also your attitude. Do not have knowledge like doctor, but act like (or worst than) a kid.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think this is true for all professions. A co worker of mine once said that she got demoted because she worked maintenance to fill in her hours. I know she gets paid the same rate as the rest of us yet I still asked her how much she gets for doing that. After she answered me I asked her if she still feels demoted. Her answer was “no”. Each of us play a vital role in our workplace. We should be thankful that somebody is willing to do their job because that might be the job we don’t want to do but is essential in the operations of the workplace. No job is menial. Be nice to the custodian or clerk etc . because they might someday be your boss. In reference to this article, be nice to other doctors because you might someday need their expertise when you experience a health crisis.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. kingkongdoctor

    Dear sir, Its a great article and it’s just sum up all the problems faced by medical profession.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Reblogged this on I'm not a saint.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Can’t agree more dharma…excellent piece!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. One of the most thought provoking articles I have read in recent times about the medical community.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Pingback: Dear doctors, be kind to each other. | People. Places. People-lings.

  7. Thanks sir for the enlightening article. As a fellow doctor, I say Amen to this. Reblogging this on my blog.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dr Bivek Kumar

      So very true and brilliantly put to words, I’m amazed the way it has been expressed as I am on the receiving end of bullying myself, and I am facing it daily

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Reblogged this on Lights, Cameras, … and commented:
    Indeed

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Fabulous article, thank you for posting your thoughts!

    I work at a teaching hospital and have shared your blog with my line manager and the HR lead. It’s a message worth giving to all staff in a healthcare environment (and all staff outside of it!).

    Liked by 1 person

  10. This is such a great article. Thank you so much for the accurate descriptions and brilliant elucidation of a serious problem that has been plaguing the medical community for long yet has not been addressed sufficiently. It is high time this issue is brought to light and put an end to. Only a change in the mindsets of such dictatorial senior doctors and a conscious effort by junior doctors not to become such bullies will resolve this problem. Kudos to you for writing such a great article.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Excellent article. Could not agree more. Brings back memories of my internship. Will try to improve myself.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. I’m a patient; and I realized that this whole medical industry is not about me, but about money. Still hope to get better 🙂

    Like

    • Muhammad mussa

      Sir not like that this is your thinking only
      money is need of every one ,no one can live his life without money .so what do you think doctors will not earn money and they start to begging in front of streets .you are going in market and buying a pent and shirt you are giving money up to his demand you will no hesitate for a second to pay an amount ,if your are going to Dr’s clinic ,you will argue as much as u can .sir drs are also human beings like you they have their own necessities. One thing I want to add here at least dr is earning by their hard work and sleepless nights. I don’t want to count the list of professionals hoW they are earning their money.
      Best of luck a head.
      and take care of your health plz no health mean no more in the world.

      Like

    • Aoife OSullivan

      Yes Mr. Bavo, that’s why all of us went into medicine, for the money. What a ridiculous and disgusting comment to make on a physician’s blog. Perhaps you would like to make it to, and then through, medical school, residency and fellowship and then return to make an educated comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Pingback: Dear doctors, be kind to each other. | Rural GP Education

  14. Reblogged this on Synapse Traffic.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Very well written article. The medical fraternity is polluted with mentally unstable, sadistic bullies who occupy senior position and has access to humiliate ad bully the junior doctors. Although a lot of complaints has been lodged on them, no actiin is taken by the KKM. Worse still, the junior doctor is painted in a negative aspect and character assasination is done. I hope, our fraternity realize this and take the effort to weed out these bullies.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. hon Dr pukose

    This article reflects what doctors go through in our training institutions

    Liked by 2 people

  17. Ma. Antonia Gem C. Austria , m.d.

    A good read. I would encourage my colleagues in the medical teaching and training profession to read this piece. Kindness and compassion certainly goes a long way!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. very well written article sir.. I have the experience of working under one such senior doctor who just screams at everybody especially me,coz I m his thesis student working directly under him. and he talks ill about everybody and fights almosts with everybody.. the nursing staff,aneasthesist,other doctors in the department.. thinks he is always correct and abusing me for things the mistakes he sometimes does.. it’s kinda torture working under him.. won’t teach and won’t let me learn either… Just waiting to get my thesis signed and then I m gonna tell him to go himself..

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Innocent houseman

    i agree with ur statement but this bullying trend is getting bad to worst
    Ppl forget they were once Housemans as well
    Experience made them better

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Dear Sir, thanks for such a kind and compassionate piece. Just out of my internship I can readily relate to most of what you have said. As interns we all have been screamed at by radiologists for carrying emergency CT requests, ridiculed for our lack of knowledge and humiliated at the bedside for lab results not coming in on time. And as you have pointed out in your writing, actual learning never happened in such settings. Instead I learnt best under physicians who were accessible, surgeons who who made us feel important and part of the team and paediatricians who gently and consistently corrected our mistakes and imparted knowledge during rounds. A colleague of mine who had always wanted to be a surgeon was so humiliated and harassed on a daily basis during his surgery rotation that he now hates the field. That is the worst that a senior surgeon can ever do. Wish that all doctors think like you sir. Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Reblogged this on Healthy Happy Me(d) and commented:
    To my colleagues and future colleagues. Be kind to one and other.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Thank you all for your comments. Once again I’m overwhelmed by the response to my blog post. I will approve all comments as long as the language isn’t abusive. Please refrain from swearing when you comment. We should all pledge to do better in life. Cheers.

    Like

    • gajaharan gangasuthan.

      very nice one .Thank you . I personally underwent all these stages but now I am home being GP .Thank God I have already left the hospital system.Pier pressures is the most notorious one to stand I believe..
      Well done Dr Dharma K.

      Liked by 1 person

  23. Please send this article to Kem Kesihatan, help the HO, nurture them not bully them

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Truly said every thing correct sir……. senior doctors should not behave this way to junior drs….. junior drs has so much pressure of that and they lead sometimes into suicides too…… dear doctors all seniors nd juniors kindly give respect to everyone… besides ur patients… because nowadays a pg resident is very much harrashed by all these things…. just for a sake of his/her training or learining in d field…. to err is human… plzz understand… if u give respect to him/her they will respect u by heart….

    Liked by 1 person

  25. I have never read such an understanding and kind piece.
    Wish there were much more doctors like you so we can grow more.
    As a working HO now, how I wish to have an amazing and understanding doctor guiding me.

    I am waiting for the generation that can break this vicious cycle.
    Thank you for giving me hope that there are someone that understood .

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Reblogged this on Diary of a Med Student and commented:
    To my future colleagues…
    What an excellent piece of writing

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Nassimu Moses

    Wonderful piece. That kind of treatment affects even the relationship between this so called senior doctor and the junior doctor much later in life. Years after medical school, am not very free with doctors who used to ridicule me during my training. Not that I planned it that way, but that it just comes out naturally. Thanks Dr for educating.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Having this conversation with my colleagues in the class. Haha, preparing for our future carrier. Thank you, doc!

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Dr Suresh Ullagaddi. ...Radiation Oncologist

    Great article ,well artic at ex highlighting the bitter truth which many of our comrades may not have guts to digest…I hav been a victim of such practice during g my student life n hav taken oath not to treat my junior drs the same way n take head on those who bully n spoil a bright car rear of budding drs…..
    I think drs in senior hierarchy Shud deserve respect n not just desire…life can’t b decided in medical student life ..it is beyond that….they Shud stop residing in fools paradise n come into reality. ….I hate to hear someone being remembered as a terrific n horrible physician rather real guts lie in being remembered for humble n a Nobel human being. ….both knowledge n humbleness can n Shud go hand in hand….

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Excellent and insightful piece of article. We shave shared it in our page.
    Keep writing
    https://www.facebook.com/medchrome

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Thanks for this writeup. I only hope senior colleagues especially among Nigerian doctors would learn from this.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Well written. One of the major hindrances to learn is the fear of asking questions. Unless we let trainees open up and ask questions, we will be bringing out doctors lacking in confidence to deal with simple problems which they will have seen many times with their seniors, whom, they would have been scared to ask questions.

    Liked by 1 person

  33. Thanks for this well written write up. I wholeheartedly agree with you. I read a similar article a while back called “How Being a Doctor Became the Most Miserable Profession” regarding the negative perception of doctors from laypeople. The article is fairly well written, until it decides to take potshots at colleagues from other specialties… ” ophthalmologists and radiologists making out like bandits” which utilizes the same negative stereotypes you discuss. Your article nicely summarizes how divided the medical profession is, and the ramifications politically can be significant. Instead of uniting to address issues of various specialties, there always have to be insulting remarks for each other. Medicine is supposed to be a collegial field as you eloquently described in your article.

    Liked by 1 person

  34. Well written and you make excellent points.

    However, you speak of stereotypes, but then perpetuate one. You spoke in one light about radiologists and did not comment on the other side and then a resident echoed your sentiment so let me share another perspective.

    As a radiology resident who is not too far from a clinical medicine internship, like clinicians, we are also under enormous pressure. Contrary to the stereotypes of the radiology of old, we are constantly working against the clock to deliver high quality work. We are behind the scenes and rarely get acknowledged by the clinicians to the patients as the doctor who made a diagnosis. That is the way it goes and most of us have come to accept that. We are judged by our supervisors not only by the quality of our reports, but by our turn around time which varies from place to place (an ER requires more rapid turn around time for example).

    I cannot speak for all radiologists, but most of us work hard to deliver this information as timely as possible and it seems very rare to see a radiologist yell or scream at an ordering clinician. I am fortunate to say that I literally have never seen that happen where I am training.

    That said, the flip side is that we get studies ordered regularly without any clinical information despite pleading with clinicians to do so. This is important for several reasons:

    1. Your information helps us in our search for answers while reviewing the images. The information may change our pretest probability and resultant diagnosis. In other words, it is in your patient’s best interest to provide information.

    2. Provided clinical information may aid in more rapid interpretation of studies which in turn means more studies can be read in a shorter time period. This benefits your patients and also your other colleagues who are waiting for reads.

    3. For billing purposes, we need a valid indication to do a study. Rule out PE or infiltrate is not an acceptable indication to bill. If you work at a hospital where radiology is owned by the facility, this may result in the hospital losing money every time you do that.

    Thus, giving your radiologist clinical information helps your patient, you, your colleagues and your hospital.

    Also please keep in mind that when you call us for a “quick prelim” so you can put our name on a progress note to explain why a patient was discharged, think about how you would feel if the roles were reversed. If you have a job to do in the hospital and were in the middle of a complicated task for a patient’s care and someone wanted you to stop taking care of your patient so you could look at their patient and make a decision in an abrupt and potentially less safe way compared to the normal thorough job you do (in a non-emergency situation) and this went on all day long every day, how would you feel?

    I do not speak for all radiologists and am sorry if any readers were hurt by other radiologists, but keep in mind we are doing the best we can too so please consider decreasing the frequency of radiology trash talking as well.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Very well said. There are the rare few clinicians that believe they should play the game of “stump the chump” and keep the radiologist guessing on the indication. My question to these people is that do you do that to any other consultant? Do you consult surgery for “abdominal pain” and then tell them to figure it out? I think this attitude has generally gone away, though.

      Speaking of stereotypes, there is often the old stereotype that radiologists have nothing better to do than drink coffee while doing nothing. Clearly whoever believes this never spent a day with the radiologist on a busy call day/night. With all the protocols, phone calls, ultrasounds to check out with the techs, outside studies to look at with clinicians, traumas to look at with the trauma team, flouros that we do ourselves, and endless studies (mostly CTs, MRIs) to read there is almost never downtime on call.

      Luckily, where I train it is generally a collegial environment, particularly with the surgeons. There is a synergistic relationship with the surgeons. They need us and we need them. They always come to the body room to discuss cases, particularly traumas where they always come to have studies read. Pretty nice example of how colleagues should communicate. I have great respect for the surgeons and their insight. This dynamic wasn’t quite like this where I did internship, so it is probably location dependent.

      Liked by 1 person

  35. Very well said. Should be circulated in all hospital s and to all doctors

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Thanks for your blog, I am in an allied health profession, although not a doctor, I have seen this behaviour in the hospital where I work. The culture is slowly changing. Also, please don’t use the term “difficult diabetic” I have had type 1 diabetes for over 30 years and I would challenge any doctor to manage the insulin and diet regime perfectly over a week, let alone a lifetime. Treat your diabetic patients as you would recommend treating your fellow doctors please!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Diabetes is a challenging disease for all doctors. I had no intention of sounding disrespectful when I said difficult diabetics. I meant patients who need the expert care of an endocrinologist and despite all our combined efforts (patient and doctor) it is near impossible to control their blood sugars. Please see it in this light. I did not write this article with the intention of being politically correct at every point. We always treat our patients better than we treat our doctors. And that is very essence of this article.

      Like

  37. Thank you all for your comments. This post was not meant to be politically correct in every sense. The purpose of me writing this is to promote kindness and tolerance within the medical community. Please take it as such and since this post also spoke about how doctors are treated by every speciality, rest assured I am in no way singling out any particular field. I gave examples based on what I have seen and experienced. But I’m not promoting stereotypes.

    Please refrain from commenting negatively about any particular speciality as you have missed the whole point of this article.

    Like

  38. I have always thought that if a senior doctor spoke to me in a way that was unacceptable I would call them out. But this seems to be exceptionally rare. Why is that? Can more junior doctors be punished for that kind of thing? It’d be really useful to know as I’ll be starting as an F1 later this year.

    Liked by 1 person

  39. Doctors do reveal at times. It’s wonderful. It’s useful. A GUIDE.

    Liked by 1 person

  40. This is a wonderful article. Thank you so much! All doctors should take note!

    Liked by 1 person

  41. Reblogged this on cj.kaduru and commented:
    Dear doctors, be kind to each other….

    Liked by 1 person

  42. jamilah adamu

    Beautiful piece doc.

    Liked by 1 person

  43. Falope Ibukunoluwa

    Well said, we actually need to be our brothers keeper rather than claiming unnecessary superiority in our different fields

    Liked by 1 person

  44. DR.SADU.T.KUNJUMMEN

    Sir, Thank you for your keen observations and excellent description of the unhealthy practices in the training system of the clinicians and their clinical practicing field. I appreciate your effort to show,how the professional rivalry can affect the outcome of a helpless patient. I suggest that IMA can contribute in this matter by conducting serious discussions including senior teaching staff in Medical Colleges and heads of departments in the private and Govt: Hospitals.

    Liked by 1 person

  45. Reblogged this on My Scribbles and commented:
    This eye-opening article applies not only to the medical professionals, but every one other person….in any profession.

    Liked by 1 person

  46. When I was an intern and then a junior resident I was blessed to be led by wonderful Consultants. These excellent physicians and surgeons NEVER put a junior doctor (or a medical student) down. They gave of themselves wholeheartedly as teachers and they produced not only good doctors but also a new generation of teaching doctors who approach their art in the same way. Going to work was almost always a treat. We made our mistakes, and learned from them, but we were always welcome to ask questions and we were given answers in a non-judgmental way. Doesn’t have to be hard.

    Liked by 1 person

  47. Very good article. I faced a similar environment in medical college.

    Liked by 1 person

  48. Reblogged this on Glykos.

    Like

  49. Trees planted together would some times brush on each other, its normal, if you understand the meaning of your being human

    Liked by 1 person

  50. Reblogged this on bishan's world and commented:
    Kindness is Key!

    This blog post by Dharmaraj Karthikesan is like pure gold – laden with courageous statements that ooze of wisdom! (like the one quoted below) thanks Dharmaraj 🙂

    The health profession needs more docs like you!

    “We often excuse doctors who are bullies because they are ‘great with patients’ and are ‘brilliant clinicians’ or ‘gifted surgeons’. This hurts the profession more than you can imagine.”

    read on ….

    Liked by 1 person

  51. Great Article! thanks so much for sharing it 🙂 I posted this article on my Facebook page and the response was astoundingly positive. Here is one quote “I love this article. If we could clone this insight, strength, empathy and compassion into every profession within health and across all aspects of life……” – touché. We are all part of one big team after all ..https://bishansworld.wordpress.com/2015/05/10/emergency-medicine-and-the-loophole-of-love/

    Liked by 1 person

  52. Reblogged this on Codynamics and commented:
    Well said doc ☺

    Liked by 1 person

  53. Air Commodore( Retd) Dr HSR Arora

    Great paper. I wish to share—–Lack of truthful communication – lack of concern touch-lack of multi-speciality approach- lack of education about the disease of the patient make the the patient suffer&suffer.Stakes are pretty high on the part of patient. Lets all the Medical professionals start concern towards these realities.

    Liked by 1 person

  54. Well said. Thank you for this insightful sharing. I hope every single doctor can read this.

    Liked by 1 person

  55. i dont believe in being mean in order to teach a lesson or to train a doctor but i do believe that people will be people. some will be bullies some will be kind. its the same in the field of medicine or anywhere. its just not “real” for everyone to be nice all the time. and imagine if that would be the case.. some great people wont be pushed/challenged to accomplish what they have because of these things. im a surgeon, i have been for a while now. i wouldnt be where i am if not for some of these so called “bullies” which i prefer to call “inspiration”. sometimes it works other times it doesnt, for me it did. if youre not a mean person/doctor dont be mean in an attempt to teach someone.. if youre just plain mean, change if u can but if not well goodluck to you. and to the younglings that are under your supervision: be strong, work hard and never give up your dreams. people are people. if it aint broke dont fix.

    Liked by 1 person

  56. As a doctor myself, I agree with your articles. Reblogging and sharing on facebook. Keep writing .

    Liked by 1 person

  57. Dr.M.R.Hariram

    Great article. Thanks.I was never bullied at any point of time.One of my professors told me that he will through me out of a window for a minor mistake. I took it sportively. I am ever grateful to him. It was a great learning experience.
    Dr.Hariram

    Liked by 1 person

  58. And I thought these were only obtainable in my climes (developing countries).
    Indeed, we (the medical professionals) need a reorientation.
    Just an excellent writeup ..flawless!!

    Liked by 1 person

  59. I found it’s hard to discuss my lessons with my friends. I don’t actually like to lend my ear listening to their explanation. Cause I think they just want someone to listen to what they have been studying about. For me, it’s kind a of wasting time. If you really care about your reading, why don’t just you finish some MCQs or make a publish. Just to prove you read well. Dear doctor, I really have problem with my ego.Can you prescribe me anything good?

    Liked by 1 person

  60. Thank you Dr. For such an important message. I am personally an intern doctor in a big hospital in Western Uganda. Our situation is not any different from that. At times a consultant brags about having saved a childs life despite the interns’ effort to kill the patient in the presence of the attendants, even when the young doctor followed present guidelines and rational use of drugs. This keeps us not only poor and unable to practoce to our best but also hesitant to make certain diagnosis due to their intimidation. We recently put
    down tools following no pay for over 4 months and guess the results. You may not believe but threats of repeating the whole rotations already done and passed. Which kind of proffession is this that i came into? Its only people like you who think straigt not to look at junior doctors as upcoming enemies but patners with a common struggle for good patient care that will change the care in health. Thank you once again.

    Liked by 3 people

  61. Anupama Reddy

    I agree, just as abuse of doctors by other doctors , is acceptable . It leads to some of the best prople leaving the profession. The burnout that occurs as a result also leads to reduced quality of care and endangerment of patients. Perhaps as a profession we can do more to awknowlege and address the problem.

    Liked by 2 people

  62. whydidibecomeadr

    Great article about the culture of residency, absolutely true. It’s not healthy and you get to the point where you regret getting into the profession in the first place. You hate your schedule, your peers, the physical place you work in…suffer while your friends outside of medicine have actual lives (spouses, children, time to vacay, etc). In addition to harassment, let me add open discrimination, corruption at institutions and retaliation if one does ever stand up to their rights, education and fair treatment. And forget first amendment and human rights…what’s that again?!

    Liked by 2 people

  63. Ritual humiliation was a teaching method when I was in medical school in the 70s. I recall being told by an eminent surgeon in front of the patient to go and get tested for syphilis. Forty years on, med school teaching is more humane. Did the humiliation pressure me learn more? Perhaps it did. There is less pressure now in med school, but more students seem to drop out.

    Liked by 2 people

  64. Ray P. Suanding

    Hats off Sir!!! This article may very well represent the sentiments of every medical doctor undergoing training anywhere in the world. . .

    Liked by 1 person

  65. Rolando A. Padre

    Instead of sharing thru Facebook, I am printing copies of your article to share to our medical staff thru their clinical departments. I hope you don’t mind. Thanks for this article, I can relate to many of the issues.

    Liked by 2 people

  66. stjohn Edemekong

    This is a well timed piece of education. Pls, allow me to print this n share among my noble colleagues.

    Liked by 1 person

  67. Yes, very real ! as every medical professionals face such situations during training or clinical practice. I think more common, and more serious in developing countries, and and esp. in private practice. Need to address the issues, and make some corrections, and not just leaving as had been since long ago, as everyone has to go through and so should oth

    Liked by 1 person

  68. Thank you for your thoughts…. Everything we do should be for the Glory of God.. ALL HIS.. We are nothing… Just His instruments…so no one will boast…

    Liked by 1 person

  69. Great, great article! It appeals greatly to logic, ethic and emotion. And somehow, most of us can relate to this article (either as the bully or as the victim)!

    Liked by 1 person

  70. beautiful article.how i pray we could all have such a mind.our profession would become the best to belong to.”do unto others what u wish to be done do to you”

    Liked by 1 person

  71. I thought this was typically a Kenyan attribute and behavior??? Once I was yelled at by a senior physician during a ward round, “nitakuchapa!” (I will spank you) to the uttermost bewilderment of those inpatients I so laboriously and dedicatedly served; another time a senior obstetrician sneered condescendingly that it wasn’t the patient who had fetal distress but – yours truly! Of course as students we were regularly reminded that we had the dumbest brains under the sun south of the Sahara. After about a decade out of clinical practice, I have quite forgotten how humiliation feels. Ain’t nothing new under the sun after all!

    Liked by 1 person

  72. Hi, I appreciate this outcry for kindness to each other in this sacred profession. Not only is this occurring between the cronies and the newbies at that described levels. It is happening in my setting between consultants. I work with the most egotistical senior consultant (unnamed) ever. This is my second year of being a consultant. The unnamed knows all except for the cause of one of patient’s death which was obvious to all around!!!!

    Other colleagues consult with me for patient care except unnamed. Unnamed has had history of bullying majority of subordinates and practices way below standard protocols, YET THE SYSTEM STILL ALLOWS UNNAMED TO BE AT THE TOP OF THE TREE. UNNAMED IS DEEMED A BULLY TO ME!!!!! I WORK STILL HERE IN THIS FRUSTRATING ENVIRONMENT EVERY DAY!!!!!

    I hope someday unnamed will feel this pain that unnamed inflicts on the victims of unnamed’s egotistical behavior and attitude.

    Great life to all!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  73. Pratap Mukherjee

    All I can say as a doctor is that one must b a good human being first and then a good doctor. As far as juniors r concerned whenever they r confronted by a bully in the form of their seniors they should let them have it once in front of patients. Remember that empty vessels make more noise, barking dogs don’t bite and nobody can judge u better except u yourself. Be good to ur patients and don’t take shit. The world will b at ur feet. Cudos for the wonderful article.

    Liked by 1 person

  74. Totally agreed sir…each n every scene happens in hospitals..great article….

    Liked by 1 person

  75. Virgilio D. Tac-an

    This article must be read by all the doctors who are using their profession and workplace for ego tripping.

    Liked by 1 person

  76. Smiling faces ít fading when it have entered the medical job.

    Liked by 1 person

  77. Olubunmi Lawal

    I absolutely love this thought provoking blog post. I can totally relate. Will share this with as many doctors as possible. We need to love and respect one another.
    Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  78. Very good article.
    Everybody will appreciate.
    But along with……. every body shall think a moment are you one among?..
    and what you will do in future?…..

    Liked by 1 person

  79. I can not agree more and I wish this article turns out to be a kind of MOVEMENT to fix things. The issues you talked about are real and can’t be ignored.
    It’s just for those issues that I decided to go Public Health, but I would have done my favorite Internal Medicine

    Liked by 1 person

  80. very well written! An eye opener for the senior doctors..

    Liked by 1 person

  81. Great article. I wish i could share this with all the bullies i work with everyday and hope it touches them to change to make the teaching hospital comfortable working/learning environment.
    I’m a final year med student and I dread waking up every morning because of fear. Fear of being bullied! Surgery is the worst rotation ever. We even have an “organised bullying session” where interns and final year students are supposed to present new cases from a 24 hour call to a room full of consultants, registrars, interns and students. The consultants head the meeting and eat you alive. It’s the most intimidating thing ever!!
    I hate my career choice everyday that goes by. Why can’t they just be nice people??!! Really hope i don’t become like them. Viscous cycle.

    Liked by 1 person

  82. Olabisi Onoviran Osagie

    I agree. No aspect of medicine is more important than the other.
    I agree. Bullying is not a necessary tool in medical training.

    But let us objectively look at the other side of the coin.
    When a houseofficer tells you a neonate with a urea level of 12mmol has an “essentially normal” E and U, your head begins to ring. He is holding the result in his hand which has the values and the normal ranges.
    When the residents leave a baby who had a major surgery without an IV line for more than 24hours, you NOT going to be concerned about his “fragile and vulnerable ego” because he had no concern for the life of the baby.

    How can you clerk a patient and not remember the details off-heart? YOU clerked. YOU. I dont get it.
    To get into medical school you had to have a level of intelligence that superceeded the average Joe.
    YOU clerked!

    “A paediatrician may swear at a doctor for missing an intravenous cannulation on a preterm neonate and then adopt a serene demeanour when facing the parents of the child.” DUH!?!?!

    “We complain, argue, fight and obsess for the sake of our patients” OF COURSE we will! What else will we do? IT IS OUR WORK TO COMPLAIN, ARGUE, FIGHT AND OBSESS FOR THE SAKE OF OUR PATIENTS. If houseofficers and registrars complain, argue, fight and obsess for the sake of our patients, there will be NO REASON to harass them.
    But these days, medical schools chug out unfeeling, uncaring doctors in droves. Doctors whose only concern is salary at the end of the month. Empathy for patients is zero.
    Doctors who think “This baby should hurry up and die. I’m tired”.

    At the end of the day, any doctor who thinks his “fragile and vulnerable ego” is more important than the life of a patient is not fit to be a doctor.

    Like

    • There has to be reasons for gross omissions not necessarily lack of intelligence. People will always make mistakes in every profession because they are human. Patients also die in the hands of top professionals due to mistakes. 195,000 deaths per year in USA due to errors. Bullying is not one of the solutions. It’s unfortunate if inadequate training in med schools contribute to this. But the bullying described here is taken as normal or a culture that one has to go through which is wrong. There could be doctors who less emphatic or wish their patients die, but I don’t want to believe it. A doctor thinking about salary at the end of the month is less related to patients’ care and it’s okay to think about money after all this is an economic world where almost everything is about money. There is no reasons to support bullying. If you think and can prove that a trainee is grossly incompetent then have him discontinued. Bullying is an outdated leadership/supervision style. It’s actually less practiced in other parts of the world, so are we going to stop it?????

      Liked by 1 person

      • olabisi osagie

        At the end of the day, one has to balance things. I don’t like bullying. I never bully. But I discover that when you try to be “Mr Nice Guy” the residents ALWAYS take advantage of you. They come late to work, have excuses for not doing their work. Cases get cancelled a lot due to unpreparedness. I end up doing my work and theirs too because as a consultant, I get blamed for every morbidity or mortality. Consultants have been sacked for residents mistakes! But I have discovered ways of dealing with residents for misbehaving without bullying. When I report to the medical council and your license is on the line, you will wish I bullied you.

        Like

    • Seriously, And Yelling at the colleague in front of the patient is the ONLY way to ensure that the junior docs do the work they are supposed to do? I agree juniors tend to take advantage of you when you’re a pushover, but I’m not asking you to be, There i s a time & place to handle anything, and when you notice someone lacking you should meet with him/her in private and explain that their work is subpar & that serious action would be taken if they don’t clean up their act. That’s not being a pushover that’s being professional, Yelling at people in front of the patients won’t really achieve anything.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Olabisi Onoviran Osagie

        Do take time to read my responses.
        I agree with you that bullying is an unnacceptable form of training and yelling at junior doctors is not acceptable too.
        The purpose of my responses is to show that:

        1. Not every trainer bullies his/her trainees.

        2. Most trainers who do, do so with a MISGUIDED idea that it will always yield better doctors and better patient care.

        3. Very few bullies do so for pleasure. Those who do so, do so because a perfect method of training in such a short time has not yet been realized. An alternative to bullying is to treathen the trainee with “serious action” and sometimes see it through. When this happens, you are hated even more than the trainer who bullies.

        4. There are as many bully-trainers as there are irresponsible-trainees.

        5. There are many complaints from patients about their care in the hospital and who is the first doctor they meet? Who spends the most time with the patient?

        6.So what do you do to a trainee who constantly exhibits acts of indiscipline even after several private “professional” admonitions?

        7. I would like responders to give this discussion group the best way to handle trainees who do not act well without being called a bully. With live examples. Step by step, “if you do this and it doesnt work, then to that. If that doesnt work, then do these”.TRAINEES THEMSELVES WILL PREFER BULLYING TO THE POSSIBILITY OF A TERMINATION OF THEIR TRAINING. One trainee in my country was arrested for hiring assassins to kill his former trainer when his training was terminated for repeated offences.

        8. Remember, every trainer was once a trainee. I too was subject to “bullying”, I too was yelled at infront of patients for ANOTHER doctor’s crime. But each time I was “bullied” I learnt the lesson and resolved firmly never to make a mistake again. Within a very short time into my training, the “bullying” stopped and the trainers learnt that I was worth my salt.

        9. Remember, every trainee will one day be a trainer. Let us see how critics of “bullying” will handle their trainees.

        10. Remember, I am NOT AN ADVOCATE OF BULLYING. I’m an advocate of OBJECTIVITY.
        The discussion was getting too one-sided.

        Like

  83. Pingback: Dear Doctors, Be Kind To Each Other | Curated Ubiquitous Rural Informed Online Services

  84. Nice article. Sums up what goes on in my school. And surgeons are the most guilty.

    Like

  85. I am a 3rd year medical student currently on my surgery rotation. I read this article and felt an overwhelming familiarity, which parallels my own situation. We have all been there and empathize with your situation. I was frustrated before reading this, but passed it on to my chief regardless. Soon after, we went into a surgery together. During the entire case he included me, asked relevant (non-pimping) questions and took time at the end to teach me valuable closure techniques. He wasn’t rushed and was empathetic and understanding of my experience level. After the surgery I thanked him for teaching and for taking extra time with me. He smiled and said “we all can be a little more kind to each other”. Thank you. Pay it forward.

    Liked by 2 people

  86. My daughter is an emergency medicine physician. Sadly, many of the things you speak about are amplified for female physicians. My daughter is very strong and very capable, but the arrogant and sardonic tenor she sometimes receives from older male colleagues causes unnecessary distress in an already stressful occupation. Thanks for addressing this so eloquently.

    Liked by 1 person

  87. This is true and I have seen it happen during my training as a doctor. It now seems like a culture that most doctors are practising and passing on to the future doctors. I personally believe this is wrong and instead of asking doctors to memorise and regurgitated data, they should instead be given an opportunity to ask questions and say what they think. Because in doing so it will give them a better understanding of the cases at hand. Apart from this they should not be scorned for giving a wrong answer because learning is a process and it needs a good and friendly environment for one to do so.

    Liked by 1 person

  88. As a 2nd year medical student (having chosen medicine after a first career in another field), this summarizes my biggest fear — and I applaud you for raising this important issue with medical training. I hope I can live through the years of clerkship and residency without losing myself.

    Liked by 1 person

  89. It comes down to the attitude of a person, doesn’t it. I wonder why one would forget the basic human qualities one should possess. Respecting and being kind to each other, as you pointed out. I’m thankful you came across the young doctor and spoke to him 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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  92. been going through everything you have written about here. trained poodles. perfectly worded. don’t know when this nightmare will be over with. wish there were more senior doctors to work under like you.

    Liked by 1 person

  93. Beautiful piece. I will be sure to share it with my daughter who is starting her 2nd year of residency. She faces this every single day! Kudos to you!!

    Liked by 1 person

  94. Suprabhat Das

    Sir, your article is nicely written . Arrogant behaviour of senior doctors is the main reason for some junior doctors losing interest in this profession. This vicious cycle should be stopped.

    Liked by 1 person

  95. Monica kandoth

    It’s a very well written article sir…and it throws light on the actual scenario of the medical profession…being an intern i have faced such problems….and you have managed to speak everyone’s mind…#respect

    Liked by 1 person

  96. Well said. I was a victim myself of egotistic colleagues in the medical profession, but big thanks to my upbringing and strong spiritual belief. I didn’t (and don’t) do the same humiliating deeds I received long time ago to those who trained under me. Thank you for this article.

    Liked by 1 person

  97. Musing Recluse

    Reblogged this on musingmeerkat.

    Liked by 1 person

  98. I am a third year medical student, and actually I’ve been really scared of clerkship because of the things I hear – that some rotations are not just a test of the physical capabilities, but also of the emotional and mental aspects. I have friends who have cried to me, thinking of giving up, and I wonder if I too would be like that when my time comes. I sure hope my will is greater than hopelessness.

    Liked by 1 person

  99. I like to think that most of us have empathy for learners. It is sad to think that this culture of belittling learners is still a significant problem. When I think of my teachers,even back to grade school,I have at least one good thing that I recall or something useful they taught me to remember. As I get older, my teachers are starting to pass away. I feel that I owe it to each of them to think of something they had taught me that I had found useful or interesting and as well being thankful for their being there when I needed them.

    I was in the OR as a surgical clerk and the surgeon asked me to present the case. I started reciting the case but stopped when the surgeon started to talk to the nurses. He asked me to go on and started talking to the other staff in the room as I spoke. Realizing his put down of me, I just carried on with the history. I kept myself going by assuring myself that everyone in the OR knew that the surgeon was the lowest one in the room not me.

    Many years later when I heard of his death, I kept my mind blank.

    Liked by 1 person

  100. Dear experienced doctor,
    If i face with the similar dehumanizing situations by my superior in the future how should i react? Should i just keep quite? Or should i say sonething to the bullier? What is the most wise reaction when facing this kind of treatment when it happens?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Stand up to those who purposely make your life difficult for no reason. Report to the higher authorities if you feel you are being singled out for bullying. Bullies are cowards. They will only respond to strength. Be prepared to be much stronger.

      And on another note, know the difference between constructive criticism and bullying. Those who appear to make your life difficult are actually doing it with your best interest at heart. You should have the mental finesse and wisdom to know the difference. Especially if you feel your quality of work improving with their guidance.

      Like

  101. Pingback: Tribes & Silos: Let’s Chat! | hcldr

  102. This commentary is spot-on!

    Liked by 1 person

  103. Pingback: Tribes, Silos: Let’s Chat! | Bernadette Keefe MD

  104. Thank you very much for your excellent writing and beautiful thoughts! Let me share this article to others!

    Liked by 1 person

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  106. Wonderful article. …. The postings i hate are the ones where I was bullied. I hated my neurosurgery posting and am dreading it as a house officer

    Liked by 1 person

  107. Reblogged this on samaru.

    Like

  108. i too am a victim to such doctors… is there a solution ?

    Liked by 1 person

  109. very well written. Thank you for taking time and “guts” to write this insightful article down

    Liked by 1 person

  110. I have suffered bullying by senior doctors.

    Worse still, bullying by my medical school. My school defers to their faculty doctors and won’t stand up to bullying doctors. My school chooses to sacrifice students instead. When I stood up to them, they sacrificed me.

    What can I do about this?

    Despite these setbacks, I remain steadfast in my aspiration to practice medicine one day.

    Liked by 1 person

  111. Pingback: It's the little things that matter... - KI Doc

  112. Great article! …I even shared this on our society’s FB .

    Liked by 1 person

  113. I had been readint this post bfore joining my housemanship.and again im reading this now.totally two different understanding and the more i scrol down i totally agree wif wat is going nw and most of the time whoevr agree wif d point mentioned above r thought to b the incompetent ho.bcz oly tis type of ho ll be facing problems mentioned above..but wat i wanted to share is my first posting s paed.and i learnd alot during that time whr my mo n specialist always thr to guide n support us.they nvr leave us alone..v r free to voice out our view our doubt o even roger them at night if baby is unwel n v r unsure how to proceed on…unfortunately my second posting in med(one of my favo sub after paed)the only thing i learn s cover my own ass.being selfish..trying to avoid managin complicated case as im so scare to cal up my superior.u nvr knw when they goin to blasted u.basically v trying to avoid stuff wic ll put us in trouble.documnent evry single reductant stuff in ehis.sample collected by xxx sent by xxx received by xxx..till then only yr work s considered done and if not result released ltr u r save bcz of this documnentation.n the responsibility ll go to lab technician…n ultimately who s goin suffer?pt itself..imsry ihv no choice…

    Liked by 1 person

  114. Very well written and analysed….. Don’t know how many of us will retain this…. For sure,I won’t be a such practictioner in my life…..

    Like

  115. Jonathan Mukanya

    Well said but i think the same respect should radiate through the whole team .I actually wonder why a patient is often referred to as Dr so and so’s patient. Its a patient for all those that contribute to the management of that patient including the dietician not to mention the ward staff. Very often critical management oprions are omitted as doctors disregard nursing staff opinion on patients because they feel they are inferior. But i have seen most knowledge being imparted to junior doctors buy nurses while their bosses, the consultants as we call them always scream and shout and develop bad reputation at that.

    Liked by 1 person

  116. Very enligthening, very direct, and definitrly true.

    Like

  117. Juliet Galeno

    Sad to say, even in other professions and even within the each organization, we already lost the mentor system – teach the young well and you will be remember forever for the lessons they learned from you. For the young, regardless of the situation where you in, LEARN AND PICK THE GOOD LESSONS AND THROW THE BAD ONES.

    Like

  118. Alexander Pandapatan

    I hope all senior doctors / consultants were the same as you. Your blog was sad but definitely true.

    Liked by 1 person

  119. Alexander Pandapatan

    It is a sad reality but very true.

    Liked by 1 person

  120. Dr Sudhakar Koppad ( Anesthesiologist )

    Kudos! For putting your experiences, with wide spectrum of clinicians from varied specialities,with a touching message.I fully endorse & acknowledge your analytics.
    Perhaps,every profession & professional would go through the gamut of pain & pleasure you have narrated during their career. I believe & understand, this trait intrigues though, cuts across both racial & geographical barriers.An excellent write up emphasising mutual respect, with humility & compassion as attributes,towards any one & every one,within & beyond the fraternity.

    Liked by 1 person

  121. Some specialists think that if they can berate other physicians under him he is a great doctor. A form of narcissism!

    Like

  122. this is very true, experiences of author should be our cornerstone of building the medic professionalism.
    We all experienced that at once in our carrier!
    Let ‘ s stand on edifying side rather than on destructive one!

    Liked by 1 person

  123. Greetings,
    I could relate to most of it except one think, I think students should become brave enough to ask question despite of fear of humiliation, fragile ego of one prevents this. I always have made it a point of asking even the most stupid questions and by that I have discovered many amazing teachers who were thought as strict and fellow students. Maybe teacher is not a bully but only frustrated by lack of enthusiasm from students part and so students fear more and vicious cycle continues.
    I hope I will write about this in my website http://www.littleradiologist.com,
    Thanks for amazing introspection. It’s motivating to know that others are thinking about peaceful practice too rather trying to be in warzone mentality.
    As for being a professional in one field and respecting other fields, I think it’s because one feels incompetent in other fields. During undergraduate days I have made it a point to go and see echo cardiography while I was just for getting date. Enthusiasm is core of science and I believe it’s dying amidst the race of differentiation.
    Even today when I am studying radiology (1st yr resident) I go out to see how other fields are advancing and try to learn from it, I hope to learn echo cardiography too because it’s awesome! Similarly I try to teach residents from other speciality what I am seeing on ultrasound.
    I believe the problem with our field is we all want to close our eyes to each other’s speciality because we think it’s beyond our reach and impractical.
    But being enthusiastic is never practical is it?
    I would quote Rollo May and end it
    “We don’t fear death, we fear the meaningless existence.”
    Please do write to me
    akshaykumar.kamble92@gmail.com
    And offcouse my website
    http://www.littleradiologist.com

    With regards,
    Dr. Akshaykumar
    Radiology resident

    Liked by 1 person

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  125. Reposted this on my blog
    http://www.quoideneufdr.wordpress.com

    Simply a beautiful article demonstrating how much we need to respect each other. Through the highs and lows, we should really hope for good collaboration between colleagues !

    Liked by 1 person

  126. Pingback: The three curses of organisational culture #WILTW | The Rolobot Rambles

  127. I’ve had the great misfortune of being taught by humiliation by one such consultant and I was constantly told to get a thick skin, let it wash over me etc., a very dangerous precedent for a doctor. If I let it all wash over me I learn to stop caring what people think of me. When that happens, I no longer care about how I treat people either; colleagues, nurses, patients, everyone. An attitude that is rife currently around the world when people talk of not caring how people feel in this post-truth era. Yes, you have the right to say whatever you like but should you? I think we’ve all forgotten how to be polite – particularly doctors to other doctors.

    Like

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